us7_crab3.gifmathtoppr.PNG
Button Game
Algebra Toothpicks
ADVM

Operations and Algebraic Thinking



Level K
Level 1
Level 2
abacus.gif
Understanding addition as putting together and adding to, and understanding subtraction as taking apart and taking from.
K.OA.1: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.



Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
K.OA.2: Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
(Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem.)
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
1.OA.1: Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (Note: See Glossary, Table 1.)
1.OA.2: Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
(Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem.)
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
2.OA.1: Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (Note: See Glossary, Table 1.)
(Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem.)
compsub.png
Comparison Subtraction



Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
1.OA.3: Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. (Students need not use formal terms for these properties.)
Examples:
Commutative property of addition:
If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known.
Associative property of addition: To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12.
Power Lines 1.png
Power Lines

Power Lines2.png
Power Lines 2

Power Lines3.png

K.OA.3: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation.
Example:
5 = 2 + 3
5 = 4 + 1
MathLines 4.png
What makes 4?
MathLines 5.png
What makes 5?

MathLines 6.png
What makes 6?
MathLines 7.png
What makes 7?

MathLines 8.png
What makes 8?
MathLines 9.png
What makes 9?

Matching-Number-Pairs-for-8
Matching-Number-Pairs-for-8

Matching-Number-Pairs-for-9
Matching-Number-Pairs-for-9

Five Frame- Play all!
Five Frame- Play all!



K.OA.4: For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
“3 and how many more make 10?” (7)
“6 and how many more make 10?” (4)
MathLines.png
Make Ten

MaNumber-Pairs-for-10
MaNumber-Pairs-for-10

Save The Whale- Number Bonds to 10
Save The Whale- Number Bonds to 10

3. Fill
3. Fill

1.OA.4: Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem.
For example:
Subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
8 + ? = 10


Fluently add and subtract within 5.
K.OA.5: Fluently add and subtract within 5.
Funny Fingers
Funny Fingers

Five Frame- Play all!
Five Frame- Play all!

Fluently add and subtract within 10.
Add and subtract within 20 using strategies.
1.OA.6: Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.
5 and a bit Ogre hit!
5 and a bit Ogre hit!

Use strategies such as:
counting on
making ten: 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14)
4. Add
4. Add

NumberBonds.png
Number Bonds 10

decomposing a number leading to a ten: 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9)
using the relationship between addition and subtraction: knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4
creating equivalent but easier or known sums: adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13
abacus.png
100 Abacus

Number Line Arithmetic
Number Line Arithmetic

Fluently add and subtract within 20.
2.OA.2: Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.
By the end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
Funky Mummy to 20
Funky Mummy to 20

Funky Mummy 20
Funky Mummy 20

Brilliant Beadstring to 20
Brilliant Beadstring to 20

Maths Square
Maths Square

Use strategies such as:
counting on
making ten: 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14)
NumberBonds.png
Number Bonds 10

decomposing a number leading to a ten: 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9)
using the relationship between addition and subtraction: knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4

creating equivalent but easier or known sums: adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13


Work with addition and subtraction equations.
1.OA.7: Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false.
For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false?
6 = 6 True
7 = 8 – 1 True
5 + 2 = 2 + 5 True
4 + 1 = 5 + 2 False
1.OA.8: Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating to three whole numbers.
For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations:
8 +? = 11
5 = ? – 3
6 + 6 = ?
Number Pairs to 20
Number Pairs to 20



1.OA.5: Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
Fairies in the Fog
Fairies in the Fog

Hundreds Chart Patterns
Hundreds Chart Patterns

Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
2.OA.3: Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.
Odd or Even
Odd or Even

2.OA.4: Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.
Rectangle Multiplication
Rectangle Multiplication
Rectangle Multiplication of Integers
Rectangle Multiplication of Integers
mult.png
On number line

Concentration Mult.png
Concentration Multiplication


Number and Operations in Base 10



Level K
Level 1
Level 2

Counting to tell the number of objects.
K.CC.4: Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
a. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
Number Track
Number Track

Wash Line 1
Wash Line 1

b. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
Numbers-to-10-on-the-MathRack
Numbers-to-10-on-the-MathRack

Numbers-to-20-on-the-MathRack
Numbers-to-20-on-the-MathRack

c. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
Fish Tank
Fish Tank

K.CC.5: Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
Octa's Rescue.png
Estimating to tell "about" how many or how much.
Estimate.png
Between 0 and 10

Estimating to tell "about" how many or how much.
Estimate.png
Between 0 and 100, 0 and 1000

tenpack.gif
Working with numbers 11 – 19 to gain foundations for place value.
K.NBT.1: Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
Grouping Grazing.png
Count by 10s

Understand place value.
1.NBT.2: Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”
Partitioning Numbers
Partitioning Numbers

b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
Dinosaur Place Value
Dinosaur Place Value

Base Blocks Addition- 2 columns
Base Blocks Addition- 2 columns

c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
Numbers-to-100-on-the-Mathrack
Numbers-to-100-on-the-Mathrack

Understand place value.
2.NBT.1: Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones.
Arrow Cards
Arrow Cards

Understand the following as special cases:
a. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a “hundred.”
b. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
placeval.png

Know number names and the count sequence.
K.CC.1: Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
K.CC.2: Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).
K.CC.3: Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).
Number Labelling
Number Labelling
Concentration 1-10.png
Concentration 1 to 10

Two Digit Number Labelling
Two Digit Number Labelling

1.NBT.1: Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
100 Square
100 Square

2.NBT.2: Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
Count to 1,000 by 10s
Count backwards from 1,000 by 10s
2.NBT.3: Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
Number Cards
Number Cards


Comparing numbers.
K.CC.6: Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. (Note: Include groups with up to ten objects.)
K.CC.7: Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
Number Order
Number Order

Comparing numbers.
1.NBT.3: Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
Compare Numbers to 100
Compare Numbers to 100

Comparing numbers.
2.NBT.4: Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
Compare Numbers to 1,000
Compare Numbers to 1,000



Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
1.NBT.4: Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
Matching-Number-Pairs-for-20
Matching-Number-Pairs-for-20

Matching-Number-Pairs-for-50
Matching-Number-Pairs-for-50

Techno Tortoise
Techno Tortoise

Grouping Grazing.png
ADD

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
2.NBT.5: Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Grouping Grazing.png
ADD and SUBTRACT

2.NBT.6: Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
2.NBT.9: Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of operations. (Note: Explanations may be supported by drawings or objects.)



2.NBT.7: Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.


1.NBT.5: Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used.
Techno Tortoise
Techno Tortoise

1.NBT.6: Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
2.NBT.8: Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100–900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100–900.







Measurement and Data



Level K
Level 1
Level 2
ruler.gif
Describe and compare measurable attributes.
K.MD.1: Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.
Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.
1.MD.2: Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit tocontexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number oflength units with no gaps or overlaps.
Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.
2.MD.1: Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.
2.MD.2: Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.
2.MD.3: Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.

K.MD.2: Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
Size Ordering
Size Ordering

1.MD.1: Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
2.MD.4: Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.



Relate addition and subtraction to length.
2.MD.5: Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.



2.MD.6: Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and differences within 100 on a number line diagram.
bargraph.gif
Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
K.MD.3: Classify objects or people into given categories; count the numbers in each category and sort the categories by count. (Note: Limit category counts to be less than or equal to 10.)

Represent and interpret data.
2.MD.9: Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.
2.MD.10: Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph. (Note: See Glossary, Table 1.)
Create Graph.png
Create Your Graph

clockpng.PNG

Tell and write time.
1.MD.3: Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
Fairy Clock
Fairy Clock

clock.png
Work with time.
2.MD.7: Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m.
Fairy Clock
Fairy Clock
Hickory Dickory Clock
Hickory Dickory Clock

Time - Analog and Digital Clocks
Time - Analog and Digital Clocks
Time - Match Clocks
Time - Match Clocks

What Time Will It Be?
What Time Will It Be?

Time to 15.png
Tell Time to 15 minutes

clock.png
Time to 15 minutes

clock3.png
Time to 5 minutes

clocky.png
Investigate Time: AM PM
AM or PM.png
AM or PM

quarter.gif
dime.gif

Dolphin Coins.png
Count Coins to 99 cents

Dolphin Feed Money.png
Race to Make the Amount

Work with money.
2.MD.8: Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?
Money
Money








Geometry



Level K
Level 1
Level 2
spaceshape.GIF
Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).
K.G.1: Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.
K.G.2: Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
Geoboard Shapes
Geoboard Shapes

K.G.3: Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three-dimensional (“solid”).

Shapes 2d3d.png
2-D or 3-D Shapes


Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
K.G.4: Analyze and compare two- and three-
dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).
Shape Tool
Shape Tool

3D Shape Match
3D Shape Match

Reason with shapes and their attributes.
1.G.1: Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
Attribute Blocks Sort
Attribute Blocks Sort

3-D Shapes: Faces, Edges, Vertices
3-D Shapes: Faces, Edges, Vertices

Build 2-D Patterns
Build 2-D Patterns

Virtual Pinboard
Virtual Pinboard

Reason with shapes and their attributes.
2.G.1: Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of angles or a given number of equal faces. (Note: Sizes are compared directly or visually, not compared by measuring.) Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes.
Polygon Sort
Polygon Sort

Triangle Sort
Triangle Sort

Triangles- Sides and Angles
Triangles- Sides and Angles


K.G.5: Model shapes in the world by building
shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
K.G.6: Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example,“Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”
Tangram
Tangram

Tangrams- Cover it!
Tangrams- Cover it!

1.G.2: Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape. (Note: Students do not need to learn formal names such as “right rectangular prism.”)
Pattern Blocks
Pattern Blocks

SpaceBlocks.png
Space Blocks

Pentominoes
Pentominoes

us7_snorkel2.gif

1.G.3: Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Unders
tand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
2.G.2: Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find the total number of them.
2.G.3: Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.
Fractions
Fractions
frac.png


Standards for Mathematical Practice

These process standards and mathematical proficiencies represent the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the National Research Council. Every lesson will include some of these practices although every practice may not be represented in every lesson. Student behaviors are connected to teacher behaviors.

Students:
Teachers:
Practice1.png
  • Analyze and explain the meaning of the problem
  • Actively engage in problem solving (Develop, carry out, and refine a plan)
  • Show patience and positive attitudes
  • Ask if their answers make sense
  • Check their answers with a different method
  • Pose rich problems and/or ask open ended questions
  • Provide wait-time for processing/finding solutions
  • Circulate to pose probing questions and monitor student progress
  • Provide opportunities and time for cooperative problem solving and reciprocal teaching
PracticeReason2.png
  • Represent a problem with symbols
  • Explain their thinking
  • Use numbers flexibly by applying properties of operations and place value
  • Examine the reasonableness of their answers/calculations
  • Ask students to explain their thinking regardless of accuracy
  • Highlight flexible use of numbers
  • Facilitate discussion through guided questions and representations
  • Accept varied solutions/representations
PracticeConstruct3.png
  • Make reasonable guesses to explore their ideas
  • Justify solutions and approaches
  • Listen to the reasoning of others, compare arguments, and decide if the arguments of others makes sense
  • Ask clarifying and probing questions
  • Provide opportunities for students to listen to or read the conclusions and arguments of others
  • Establish and facilitate a safe environment for discussion
  • Ask clarifying and probing questions
  • Avoid giving too much assistance (e.g., providing answers or procedures)
PracticeModel.png

  • Allow time for the process to take place (model, make graphs, etc.)
  • Model desired behaviors (think alouds) and thought processes (questioning, revision, reflection/written)
  • Make appropriate tools available
  • Create an emotionally safe environment where risk taking is valued
  • Provide meaningful, real world, authentic, performance-based tasks (non traditional work problems)
PracticeTools.png
  • Select and use tools strategically (and flexibly) to visualize, explore, and compare information
  • Use technological tools and resources to solve problems and deepen understanding
  • Make appropriate tools available for learning (calculators, concrete models, digital resources, pencil/paper, compass, protractor, etc.)
  • Use tools with their instruction
PracticePrecision.png
  • Calculate accurately and efficiently
  • Explain their thinking using mathematics vocabulary
  • Use appropriate symbols and specify units of measure
  • Recognize and model efficient strategies for computation
  • Use (and challenging students to use) mathematics vocabulary precisely and consistently
PracticeStructure.png
  • Look for, develop, and generalize relationships and patterns
  • Apply reasonable thoughts about patterns and properties to new situations
  • Provide time for applying and discussing properties
  • Ask questions about the application of patterns
  • Highlight different approaches for solving problems
PracticeEight.png
  • Look for methods and shortcuts in patterns and repeated calculations
  • Evaluate the reasonableness of results and solutions
  • Provide tasks and problems with patterns
  • Ask about possible answers before, and reasonableness after computations


Math Magician Choose what you practice: ex. +7, +8, +9, -6, -7, -8

Addition fact flash cards To print!
Subtraction fact flash cards To print!

Digit Workout Choose to add or subtract.

Number Balance Use a balance to compare calculations

Tangrams
Symmetry Sort Find lines of symmetry.

Solid (3-D) shapes
Matching Pairs Find the solid shapes that match. Try to name the shapes if you can!

Puzzle Parlor Games

State Quarters

Leap Frog

Shape Sorter

Cool Math 4 Kids

Math PlaygroundDREAMBOX!!!!